Lucie’s Liver 1

On top of losing Manjula, the house being really quiet for a whole year so missing the hustle and bustle of our lively home, Lucie has not been well.

Her Liver is swollen maybe due to a growth but her doc Bhaghya thinks it’s not cancerous as there’s no indication of it spreading.

So we plan another visit to Bangalore to a more sophisticated scanner and possibly an operation.

Fingers and claws are crossed.

We’re on a road trip.
With no one left behind
To visit vetenarian hospital in Bangalore for a Lucie blood test

The results are good so no need for a scan and after handing over parcels for Usha

we’re off back home.

Stopping on the way for lunch at fishland one of our favourite restaurants.

Manjula and I would have a drive through the countryside in the Ambassador drop in here for lunch after her regular visits to the clinic.

The staff asked where Madam was, I continue to share the old news which helps recognise and celebrate.

Really?

Could this get anymore awkward?

I blame myself. Nurse Farrell is trying to rehydrate Lucie. It’s a drip set up for water under her skin that will then spread into her body.

So it’s relatively straightforward and not intravenous. It’s twice a day and there’s lots of water.

Between us though we manage to add complexity.

Last night, after a major spillage of half the water it was relatively easy-going.

Next day, not so good.

First thing today Lucie decides to do a big shake as if she’d just stepped out of a river, presumably because the bad bad nurse dropped a smidgeon of water on her fur. So needle came out and I had to replace it and jab her again.

Next she was standing rigid, clearly uncomfortable, I got her to sit down. The early puppy training of SIT! being useless so it entailed manhandling. Eventually I get her to lie down without knocking the needle out but on my feet.

I’m now stuck here watching the interminable drops expecting it to last an age.

I have time to catch up with my writing. 🙂✍🏽🚴🏽🗄🧷🖌☮️🚭🔔 and realise there’s soooo many emojis.

But I’ve still not had my breakfast!

Do we really need to do this twice everyday? It’s taking hours. I’ll plan better with my paraphernalia around me…..

This was how the professional did it yesterday. Doc Bhagya.

So who’s the drip?

Update

The merciless drip drip dripping took three hours and we’ve now created a camel, perhaps more accurately a dromedary.

Evening drippping completed in 40 mins morning torture must have been something else problem. Only issue this eve was jittery ness from fireworks.

Farrell Factoid: Lucy has had both liver and kidney issues this year, primarily shown through, vomiting and ‘loose’ motions. She seems quite good in herself and most recent blood test suggests kidney situation has stabilised. This all might be due to age or Tick fever earlier this year.

Harder for Lucie

It’s hard for us all

This was relative calm after she’d objected to being prodded, and held on her back with legs in the air. So unladylike.
The foggy scan.

The vet thinks her kidney is smaller and misshapen does potential for renal failure. Poor Lucie.

Next step is special diet and another blood test in two weeks.

None of us are happy.

when we meet

When we dogs meet each other for the first time, with a sniff in the air (or if daring, up the bum) a wave of the tail a look in the eye we quickly decide: is the newcomer above, below or equal to me?

We signal by the tail. If they are lower in status the tail tucks in between the legs and they physically cower.

People often, psychologically and socially do the same.

After an initial look, a few questions, key words they evaluate the other.

Are they on the same level? If so, they’ll behave adult to adult,

Or are they so different in terms of age, caste, colour, race or religion? If they perceive one above the other they’ll behave like parent and child. If they’re uncertain there maybe a tussle to work out their relative positions.

People do this, often and everywhere.

It may help them feel superior or inferior uncomfortable or comfortable, accepted, rejected. It helps define who we think we are and how we relate to others. It’s common and often involves games to clarify, communicate and impose. I’ve adapted this from transactional analysis as featured in the book: “Games People Play’.

Yes, some dogs can read, but don’t tell anyone.

All societies do it, to varying degrees but ultimately in my view can often reinforce status, encourage elitism and highlight difference. It leads to unacceptable behaviours, social distance and it’s not very nice.

from Lucie’s soap box